Categories
Scriptwriting

Audience.

In this assignment, you will think about how to adapt Shakespeare’s play for a live performance. You will
create a digital storyboard that shows how you would adapt Hamlet’s soliloquy to present it to a modern
audience. Read Hamlet’s soliloquy, and then write an adaptation of it in contemporary English. Focus on
maintaining the meaning and tone of the original by paying close attention to the impact of word choice.
Use the Hamlet figures and speech bubbles to show how an actor would perform your adaptation. Be
sure that there is a strong relationship between the gestures of the figures and the meaning and tone of
the text

Categories
Scriptwriting

Does the ad meet the timing requirements of the spot?

Using your strategic message planner, script and storyboard, produced a final version of a 30-second TV commercial for a consumer product of your choice (no alcohol, tobacco, firearms or any products that would embarrass a group of grandparents). Please follow your textbook’s instructions for the strategic message planner, script and storyboard. Submit your .MP4 or .MOV file to this dropbox.
GRADING CRITERIA
Do the pictures and the words work together?
Is the lighting appropriate?
Are audio levels appropriate?
Does the width of the shot change after each shot (CUs can be an exception)?
Does the angle of the shot change after each shot?
Does the length of the shot change after each shot?
Does the action cross the axis?
Are shots appropriately framed?
Was a tripod used to keep the shot steady?
Were supers/ chyrons properly used and correctly spelled?
Does the ad meet the timing requirements of the spot?
1.Review radio: Remember the tips for radio advertisements. All of the guidelines discussed for radio on pages 189–195 hold true for writing television advertisements.
2.Think visually: But also remember that television is not radio with pictures. Work toward marrying pictures, graphics, words and music into a cohesive and effective message.
3.Tell a story: Tell a story that relates to both the reality and dreams of the target audience. In successful commercials, viewers project themselves into the situations being portrayed. That means that the advertisement must be in touch with reality—either the reality of the audience’s current situation or that to which it aspires.
4.Stay on message: Entertainment is a strategy, not a goal. It’s fine to use entertainment to raise a commercial above the clutter of competing media messages. But if the viewer doesn’t remember the purpose for the commercial—the strategic message about the client’s product—the ad is a waste of money.
5.Test your message: This is good advice for any advertising message. But it’s especially true for television advertising because of its cost. It’s a lot easier to fine-tune the message during the preproduction stage than it is after the ad is—using the jargon of the business—”in the can.” Large agencies and companies will first produce several versions of a commercial and conduct private audience tests before public release.
6.Respect the audience: Remember that the viewers have most of the power in this relationship. If they don’t like you or think you don’t like them, the ad will be a wasted effort. Earn viewers’ respect by talking to—not at—them. And because of the size of the television audience, many who see your message may be outside your target audience. They deserve—and will demand—equal respect.
my smp is attached

Categories
Scriptwriting

Does the ad meet the timing requirements of the spot?

Using your strategic message planner, script and storyboard, produced a final version of a 30-second TV commercial for a consumer product of your choice (no alcohol, tobacco, firearms or any products that would embarrass a group of grandparents). Please follow your textbook’s instructions for the strategic message planner, script and storyboard. Submit your .MP4 or .MOV file to this dropbox. GRADING CRITERIA
Do the pictures and the words work together?
Is the lighting appropriate?
Are audio levels appropriate?
Does the width of the shot change after each shot (CUs can be an exception)?
Does the angle of the shot change after each shot?
Does the length of the shot change after each shot?
Does the action cross the axis?
Are shots appropriately framed?
Was a tripod used to keep the shot steady?
Were supers/ chyrons properly used and correctly spelled?
Does the ad meet the timing requirements of the spot? 1.Review radio: Remember the tips for radio advertisements. All of the guidelines discussed for radio on pages 189–195 hold true for writing television advertisements.
2.Think visually: But also remember that television is not radio with pictures. Work toward marrying pictures, graphics, words and music into a cohesive and effective message.
3.Tell a story: Tell a story that relates to both the reality and dreams of the target audience. In successful commercials, viewers project themselves into the situations being portrayed. That means that the advertisement must be in touch with reality—either the reality of the audience’s current situation or that to which it aspires.
4.Stay on message: Entertainment is a strategy, not a goal. It’s fine to use entertainment to raise a commercial above the clutter of competing media messages. But if the viewer doesn’t remember the purpose for the commercial—the strategic message about the client’s product—the ad is a waste of money.
5.Test your message: This is good advice for any advertising message. But it’s especially true for television advertising because of its cost. It’s a lot easier to fine-tune the message during the preproduction stage than it is after the ad is—using the jargon of the business—”in the can.” Large agencies and companies will first produce several versions of a commercial and conduct private audience tests before public release.
6.Respect the audience: Remember that the viewers have most of the power in this relationship. If they don’t like you or think you don’t like them, the ad will be a wasted effort. Earn viewers’ respect by talking to—not at—them. And because of the size of the television audience, many who see your message may be outside your target audience. They deserve—and will demand—equal respect.
my smp is attached

Categories
Scriptwriting

Is there conflict?

Writing Assignment 6: Act I (Due 10/25)
Write Act I in proper screenplay format using screenplay formatting software. Act I should set up your story, where and when it takes place, introduce the protagonist and his problem/predicament; introduce his want; show us what is at stake. Act I should end with the inciting incident.
Readers assigned: Act I (for 10/25).
Act I is your screenplay’s setup. It should introduce your main character and their predicament, powerfully and cinematically; and establish that character’s want, the dramatic premise, and time lock, if there is one. It can hint our the character’s strengths and weaknesses, or an increasingly powerful threat to the character’s want. It should end with the inciting incident — the action that sets the story in motion. It should do all of this visually and efficiently.
ACT I Checklist:
Does scene 1 begin with powerful visual storytelling and an active protagonist? Does it set up your main character’s predicament?
Is your main character clear?
Is the protagonist’s want clear?
Is the dramatic premise clear?
Are the stakes “life and death”?
Is the want urgent?
Is there a timelock?
Is there conflict?
Does Act I end with the Inciting Incident? (This should be more or less at the bottom of page 1 of your five-page script.)
Re-read your script to ensure it answers these questions and that your format, punctuation, and spelling are correct. Download a PDF from Celtx and upload your script to Blackboard. Your script file should have your last name + script + date (for example: glicksmanscript20201010).
How to download your script to PDF in Celtx:

Categories
Scriptwriting

Is there conflict?

Writing Assignment 6: Act I (Due 10/25)
Write Act I in proper screenplay format using screenplay formatting software. Act I should set up your story, where and when it takes place, introduce the protagonist and his problem/predicament; introduce his want; show us what is at stake. Act I should end with the inciting incident.
Readers assigned: Act I (for 10/25).
Act I is your screenplay’s setup. It should introduce your main character and their predicament, powerfully and cinematically; and establish that character’s want, the dramatic premise, and time lock, if there is one. It can hint our the character’s strengths and weaknesses, or an increasingly powerful threat to the character’s want. It should end with the inciting incident — the action that sets the story in motion. It should do all of this visually and efficiently.
ACT I Checklist:
Does scene 1 begin with powerful visual storytelling and an active protagonist? Does it set up your main character’s predicament?
Is your main character clear?
Is the protagonist’s want clear?
Is the dramatic premise clear?
Are the stakes “life and death”?
Is the want urgent?
Is there a timelock?
Is there conflict?
Does Act I end with the Inciting Incident? (This should be more or less at the bottom of page 1 of your five-page script.)
Re-read your script to ensure it answers these questions and that your format, punctuation, and spelling are correct. Download a PDF from Celtx and upload your script to Blackboard. Your script file should have your last name + script + date (for example: glicksmanscript20201010).
How to download your script to PDF in Celtx:

Categories
Scriptwriting

Select a scene from one of the four movies that was assigned in weeks 1-4.

Select a scene from one of the four movies that was assigned in Weeks 1-4. Now rewrite it IN PROPER SCREENPLAY FORMAT using a character from one of the other movies. (i.e. What if Butch Cassidy had to fight in the waterfall challenge from Black Panther? What if T’Challa was the flight attendant in the Bridesmaids scene?)
WRITE A BRAND NEW SCENE! Don’t copy the text from the existing professional screenplay as Turnitin will flag this as plagiarism. Show us how rewriting with this different character changes the meaning and outcome of the original scene. Be Creative! (length can be from 2-5 pages)
We suggest you use one of these screenplay software solutions:
https://www.celtx.com/

Categories
Scriptwriting

What if butch cassidy had to fight in the waterfall challenge from black panther?

Select a scene from one of the four movies that was assigned in Weeks 1-4. Now rewrite it IN PROPER SCREENPLAY FORMAT using a character from one of the other movies. (i.e. What if Butch Cassidy had to fight in the waterfall challenge from Black Panther? What if T’Challa was the flight attendant in the Bridesmaids scene?)
WRITE A BRAND NEW SCENE! Don’t copy the text from the existing professional screenplay as Turnitin will flag this as plagiarism. Show us how rewriting with this different character changes the meaning and outcome of the original scene. Be Creative! (length can be from 2-5 pages)
We suggest you use one of these screenplay software solutions:
https://www.writerduet.com/
https://www.celtx.com/
https://trial.finalpublish.com/

Categories
Scriptwriting

It was revised several times, as was her final script.

Learning Goal: I’m working on a scriptwriting project and need an explanation and answer to help me learn.
USING VISUAL STORYTELLING, write a treatment (one-page max) of your story idea in prose form with a beginning, middle, and end—and in 3-act structure. You should have a clear, active character with a clear want and a clear setup. You should briefly describe the obstacles the character will come up against in increasing order of difficulty. You should include your character’s climatic action. And finally, the resolution: what happens when the character takes his final action. Remember that your final, 5-page script will contain approximately 12 to 15 scenes. Do not include dialogue. Remember: Character is action. Who the character is, what that chracter wants, is visible through the actions they take.
Attached you’ll find a sample treatment by one of our scriptwriting students. It was revised several times, as was her final script. Correctly, the treatment should be written in present tense.

Categories
Scriptwriting

Learning goal: i’m working on a scriptwriting writing question and need a sample publish to help me learn.

Learning Goal: I’m working on a scriptwriting writing question and need a sample publish to help me learn.
Write a 2 page script using proper structure with no dialog (beginning, mid- dle, and end.

Categories
Scriptwriting

As a director, the student will develop and communicate a production concept or theatrical approach for one of the following plays: Antigone, Lysistrata, or Macbeth. Once you have selected the play, as the director you need to decide what story you want to tell. How do you want audiences to respond to your production?

As a director, the student will develop and communicate a production concept or theatrical approach for one of the following plays: Antigone, Lysistrata, or Macbeth. Once you have selected the play, as the director you need to decide what story you want to tell. How do you want audiences to respond to your production? What is the theme or message you most want to highlight? It is fine to set Macbeth in feudal Japan, or the Wild West, or the Trump White House – but remember to answer (and likely begin with) the crucial question of why. Share your ideas on the where, the when, and particularly the why of your production. What drew you toward your understanding of the play and how you want audiences to respond to it? What images or research or analysis inspired your ideas? Is there anything about the characters of the play you should share that is particularly relevant to your vision? You also will submit a detailed written outline of your concept presentation. (no word limited but be brief plz)