Categories
Civil Engineering

Question 1. Discuss the primary goal in steel production. Describe metallic bon

Question 1. Discuss the primary goal in steel production. Describe metallic bonds, why they result in well-
ordered crystals, why metallic bonds can be conductive, and three different types of defects that can occur in crystal structures. Question 2. Using the following phase diagram to answer this question:
a. At what temperature will 30% (by weight) combination of aluminum and lithium be in a fully liquid phase?
b. What range of lithium weight percent will result in the Al2Li3 phase at 200C
Question 3. Describe the pros and cons of using epoxy coated rebar. Question 4. Discuss corrosion in concrete including its causes and different ways to delay it.
Question 5. Explain what makes steel a good candidate for use in concrete reinforcement.
Question 6
Explain why concrete cracks when steel reinforcement corrodes. Why does carbonation of the concrete cause steel reinforcement to corrode?

Categories
Civil Engineering

Looking for someone skill to draw this Architectural layout to draw in Autocad,

Looking for someone skill to draw this Architectural layout to draw in Autocad,
Structural drawing with all elements.
I attached a sample of what needed.

Categories
Civil Engineering

The page requirement is 3-5 pages. you should spend between 1.5 and 2.5 pages on

The page requirement is 3-5 pages. you should spend between 1.5 and 2.5 pages on both sections (reflection and analysis), for a total of 3-5 pages.

Categories
Civil Engineering

Problem 4.14 (page 175): The annual peak discharges at USGS 01671100 Little Riv

Problem 4.14 (page 175): The annual peak discharges at USGS 01671100 Little River near Doswell, VA are listed in the following table. Complete a flood frequency analysis using the: Station skew coefficient
Weighted skew coefficient
Year
Peak (cfs)
Year
Peak (cfs)

1961
4430
1988
1010

1962
1840
1989
2610

1963
850
1990
850

1964
730
1991
520

1965
790
1992
2990

1966
515
1993
3910

1967
1020
1994
1050

1968
12000
1995
2210

1969
880
1996
959

1970
1780
1997
3380

1971
8300
1998
466

1972
2290
1999
1040

1973
2610
2000
161

1974
4890
2001
2670

1975
2480
2002
1870

1976
1090
2003
1340

1977
4120
2004
873

1978
4120
2005
1880

1979
2000
2006
1010

1980
164
2007
528

1981
1490
2008
1380

1982
1360
2009
1900

1983
3470
2010
2560

1984
3240
2011
559

1985
2240
2012
3680

1986
2340
2013
1130

1987
1110
2014
1100

Categories
Civil Engineering

I uploaded project you have to do a construction take off, estimate, and schedul

I uploaded project you have to do a construction take off, estimate, and schedule using the drawings I gave you please you can do excel or draw it out

Categories
Civil Engineering

Problem 4.14 (page 175): The annual peak discharges at USGS 01671100 Little Riv

Problem 4.14 (page 175): The annual peak discharges at USGS 01671100 Little River near Doswell, VA are listed in the following table. Complete a flood frequency analysis using the: Station skew coefficient Weighted skew coefficient
Year Peak (cfs) Year Peak (cfs) 1961 4430 1988 1010 1962 1840 1989 2610 1963 850 1990 850 1964 730 1991 520 1965 790 1992 2990 1966 515 1993 3910 1967 1020 1994 1050 1968 12000 1995 2210 1969 880 1996 959 1970 1780 1997 3380 1971 8300 1998 466 1972 2290 1999 1040 1973 2610 2000 161 1974 4890 2001 2670 1975 2480 2002 1870 1976 1090 2003 1340 1977 4120 2004 873 1978 4120 2005 1880 1979 2000 2006 1010 1980 164 2007 528 1981 1490 2008 1380 1982 1360 2009 1900 1983 3470 2010 2560 1984 3240 2011 559 1985 2240 2012 3680 1986 2340 2013 1130 1987 1110 2014 1100

Categories
Civil Engineering

You are tasked with designing the pipe network included in this file. In EPANET,

You are tasked with designing the pipe network included in this file. In EPANET, you need to import this file as a Network. You can view this file in Excel if you want. The file contains a reservoir (modeled as endless supply of water at constant elevation) and 10 nodes, which each have an associated maximum demand (in cfs), elevation, and coordinates (dimensions in ft). This maximum demand then gets multiplied by a factor during the 24 hours of the day to account for daily use patterns as shown below (and included in this file)
When you click Project→Run Analysis, it will analyze the flow through the network over the 24 hour period. To find the major loss, it will use the Hazen-Williams equation, which is an empirical equation that only works for water at standard temperature. The advantage of this equation is that it is simple and that it uses ?
C (independent of Reynolds number) rather than ?f like the Darcy-Weisbach equation (dependent on Reynolds number, often requiring iteration):
?=4.52?1.85?−1.85?−4.87S=4.52Q1.85C−1.85D−4.87,
where ?Q is the volumetric flow rate (gal/min), ?C is the roughness coefficient, ?D is the hydraulic diameter (inches), and ?S is the slope of the energy line (head loss per length of pipe). For this analysis, we are using ?=100C=100, which is conservative. Newer and smoother pipes have higher values of ?C, so this is likely a value for a pipe with considerable build-up of scale.
Once you’ve run the analysis, you will want to use the Map tab in the Browser window to analyze the Nodes for Pressure. This will bring up a scale, and if you press the play button in the Browser, you can watch how the pressure changes with time at each node according to color. The goal is to keep the average pressure around 50 psi. To maintain adequate service, the system should not dip below 35 psi at any node. While the system can probably sustain pressures as high as 80 psi or more, water hammer can lead to larger pressure fluctuations. To be safe, avoid any pressures above 65 psi.
The .inp file has 6 inch pipes by default, and you will find after the analysis that some nodes will have too low pressure when flow rates are high. This means that there is too much head loss leading up to them, and you can simply size up the pipe to lower the head loss. Pipe sizes are in inches—remember to use standard pipe sizes (e.g., 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 24 inch).
You will also find that some nodes have high pressure. This will occur when flow rates are low. The fix for this may not be as easy. You may be able to mitigate it by using smaller pipes upstream of the junction, but at the lowest flow rates, head loss is negligible, and the high pressures are a function of elevation difference (generally when there is a difference of about 80 ft or more). What is typically done is to separate these points from the rest of the system by connecting them to a water tank that is connected to the main system, forming what is called a “pressure zone”. When creating pressure zones, you will need to add a tank with an elevation approximately at the ground level of the point where you place it. It will need to have a lower maximum elevation than the reservoir to provide a lower pressure when flows are low. You will need to play with its min, max, and starting elevations. Here is an introductory video on adding tanks.
When you have finished modifying the network, please write a one-to-two-page memo (see this linkand this link) describing the challenges you faced and justifying the engineering decisions you made. Please attach tables showing the diameters of your pipes, the dimensions of your storage tank, and the maximum and minimum pressures at the times of concern, as well as your project (.net) file and an image of your new pipe layout.
You are allowed to work in groups up to two on this project. If you do work with someone, please be sure to include both of your names on the project. If working as a group, you must submit an alternative design (e.g., that includes a pump for the low pressure issue) and explain which you believe to be the better design.
For a more detailed work-through of pipe network design in EPANET, I encourage you to consult this great resource put together by Robert Pitt at the University of Alabama.

Categories
Civil Engineering

You are tasked with designing the pipe network included in this file. In EPANET,

You are tasked with designing the pipe network included in this file. In EPANET, you need to import this file as a Network. You can view this file in Excel if you want. The file contains a reservoir (modeled as endless supply of water at constant elevation) and 10 nodes, which each have an associated maximum demand (in cfs), elevation, and coordinates (dimensions in ft). This maximum demand then gets multiplied by a factor during the 24 hours of the day to account for daily use patterns as shown below (and included in this file)
When you click Project→Run Analysis, it will analyze the flow through the network over the 24 hour period. To find the major loss, it will use the Hazen-Williams equation, which is an empirical equation that only works for water at standard temperature. The advantage of this equation is that it is simple and that it uses ?
C (independent of Reynolds number) rather than ?f like the Darcy-Weisbach equation (dependent on Reynolds number, often requiring iteration):
?=4.52?1.85?−1.85?−4.87S=4.52Q1.85C−1.85D−4.87,
where ?Q is the volumetric flow rate (gal/min), ?C is the roughness coefficient, ?D is the hydraulic diameter (inches), and ?S is the slope of the energy line (head loss per length of pipe). For this analysis, we are using ?=100C=100, which is conservative. Newer and smoother pipes have higher values of ?C, so this is likely a value for a pipe with considerable build-up of scale.
Once you’ve run the analysis, you will want to use the Map tab in the Browser window to analyze the Nodes for Pressure. This will bring up a scale, and if you press the play button in the Browser, you can watch how the pressure changes with time at each node according to color. The goal is to keep the average pressure around 50 psi. To maintain adequate service, the system should not dip below 35 psi at any node. While the system can probably sustain pressures as high as 80 psi or more, water hammer can lead to larger pressure fluctuations. To be safe, avoid any pressures above 65 psi.
The .inp file has 6 inch pipes by default, and you will find after the analysis that some nodes will have too low pressure when flow rates are high. This means that there is too much head loss leading up to them, and you can simply size up the pipe to lower the head loss. Pipe sizes are in inches—remember to use standard pipe sizes (e.g., 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 24 inch). You will also find that some nodes have high pressure. This will occur when flow rates are low. The fix for this may not be as easy. You may be able to mitigate it by using smaller pipes upstream of the junction, but at the lowest flow rates, head loss is negligible, and the high pressures are a function of elevation difference (generally when there is a difference of about 80 ft or more). What is typically done is to separate these points from the rest of the system by connecting them to a water tank that is connected to the main system, forming what is called a “pressure zone”. When creating pressure zones, you will need to add a tank with an elevation approximately at the ground level of the point where you place it. It will need to have a lower maximum elevation than the reservoir to provide a lower pressure when flows are low. You will need to play with its min, max, and starting elevations. Here is an introductory video on adding tanks.
When you have finished modifying the network, please write a one-to-two-page memo (see this linkand this link) describing the challenges you faced and justifying the engineering decisions you made. Please attach tables showing the diameters of your pipes, the dimensions of your storage tank, and the maximum and minimum pressures at the times of concern, as well as your project (.net) file and an image of your new pipe layout.
You are allowed to work in groups up to two on this project. If you do work with someone, please be sure to include both of your names on the project. If working as a group, you must submit an alternative design (e.g., that includes a pump for the low pressure issue) and explain which you believe to be the better design.
For a more detailed work-through of pipe network design in EPANET, I encourage you to consult this great resource put together by Robert Pitt at the University of Alabama.

Categories
Civil Engineering

1.1 what are the relative stiffnesses, distribution factor, fixed end moments. 1

1.1 what are the relative stiffnesses, distribution factor, fixed end moments.
1.2 The end moments for each member.
1.3 The free body diagram of each member.
1.4 The free body diagram of the whole structure.
1.5 The reaction forces in each support
1.6 The shear force diagram
1.7 The bending moment diagram.

Categories
Civil Engineering

1.1 what are the relative stiffnesses, distribution factor, fixed end moments. 1

1.1 what are the relative stiffnesses, distribution factor, fixed end moments.
1.2 The end moments for each member.
1.3 The free body diagram of each member.
1.4 The free body diagram of the whole structure.
1.5 The reaction forces in each support
1.6 The shear force diagram
1.7 The bending moment diagram.